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Happy Healthy Holiday Recipes

Apple & Squash Bake made with Splenda
Apple & Squash Bake made with Splenda


We all want to enjoy holiday foods. For those with diabetes, the holidays are a tricky time to navigate diet and nutrition. Crittenton Home Care encourages you to prepare special dishes for loved ones with diabetes to ensure that they have a safe (and yummy) holiday season!

Here are two recipes we found that fit in well with holiday meal planning and are also recommended by the Diabetes Association.

Apple & Squash Bake

Made with Splenda to help reduce sugar intake
Apples and butternut squash come together for a delicious, baked treat.

Number of servings: 8
Serving Size: 3/4 cup squash and apple bake

Ingredients

  • 1/3 cup SPLENDA® No Calorie Sweetener, Granulated
  • 1 teaspoon molasses
  • 1/4 cup light butter
  • 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground mace
  • 2 pounds butternut squash – peeled, seeded, and cut into 1/2 inch slices
  • 2 large apples – cored, and cut into 1/2 inch slices

Preparation

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).
  2. In a medium bowl, stir together SPLENDA® Granulated Sweetener, molasses, butter, flour, salt, and mace. Arrange squash in an ungreased 9×13 inch baking dish. Top with slices of apple, then sprinkle with the sugar mixture. Cover with a lid or aluminum foil.
  3. Bake for 50 to 60 minutes in the preheated oven, or until squash is tender.

Nutritional Information (per serving)

  • Calories: 120
  • Calories from Fat: 30
  • Total Fat: 3.5g
  • Saturated Fat: 2g
  • Cholesterol: 10mg
  • Sodium: 340mg
  • Total Carbs: 24g
  • Dietary Fiber: 4g
  • Sugars: 9g
  • Protein: 2g

Green Beans Romano

A great dish with sun-dried tomatoes and almonds.

Serves: 4
Serving Size: 1/4 of recipe

Ingredients:

  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1/3 cup slivered almonds
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 16-ounce package of frozen green beans, thawed
  • 1/3 cup sun-dried tomatoes, slivered
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt

Preparation:
In a medium skillet, heat olive oil over medium-high heat. Saute almonds and garlic until golden. (Watch carefully so they don’t burn!) Add green beans, sun-dried tomatoes, and salt; sauté 6 to 7 minutes, or until green beans are heated. Serve immediately.

Nutrition Information:

  • Calories 180
  • Total Fat 13 g
  • Saturated Fat 1.4 g
  • Trans Fat 0 g
  • Cholesterol 0 mg
  • Sodium 245 mg
  • Potassium 455 mg
  • Total Carbohydrate 14 g
  • Dietary Fiber 5 g
  • Sugars 2 g
  • Protein 5 g
  • Phosphorous 110 mg
  • Food Exchanges: 2 Vegetable, 2 1/2 Fat

A special note from diabetes.org
Not all recipes presented here are necessarily appropriate for all people with diabetes, nor will all recipes fit into every meal plan. No two meal plans are alike. Work with your health care provider, diabetes educator or dietitian to design a meal plan that’s right for you, and includes the foods you love. A key message for people with diabetes is “Carbs Count.” Foods high in carbs (carbohydrates) — bread, tortillas, rice, crackers, cereal, fruit, juice, milk, yogurt, potatoes, corn, peas, sweets — raise your blood glucose levels the most.

For many people, having 3 or 4 servings of a carb choice at each meal and 1 or 2 servings at snacks is about right. Keep an eye on your total number of servings. For example, if you choose to have dessert, cut back on potatoes.

Round out your meals with a serving of:

  • Meat (such as fish or chicken) or meat substitute (such as beans, eggs, cheese, and tofu) about the size of a deck of cards.
  • Non-starchy vegetables (such as broccoli or lettuce). If you have three (3) or more servings of non-starchy vegetables, count them as a carbohydrate choice. Three (3) servings is equal to 1 1/2 cups of cooked vegetables, or three (3) cups of raw vegetables.

Check your blood glucose to see how your food choices or these recipes affect your blood glucose. If your meal plan isn’t working for you, talk to your dietitian about making a new one.
Along with exercise and medications (insulin or oral diabetes pills), nutrition is important for good diabetes management. By eating well-balanced meals in the correct amounts, you can keep your blood glucose level as close to normal (non-diabetes level) as possible.

The recipes on this page are only a part of what is offered in recipe books from the American Diabetes Association. Many also include information on meal planning, portion control, food buying and seasoning, as well as general cooking hints and tips for people with diabetes.



We all want to enjoy holiday foods. For those with diabetes, the holidays are a tricky time to navigate diet and nutrition. Crittenton Home Care encourages you to prepare special dishes for loved ones with diabetes to ensure that they have a safe (and yummy) holiday season!

Here are two recipes we found that fit in well with holiday meal planning and are also recommended by the Diabetes Association.

Apple & Squash Bake

Made with Splenda to help reduce sugar intake
Apples and butternut squash come together for a delicious, baked treat.

Number of servings: 8
Serving Size: 3/4 cup squash and apple bake

Ingredients

  • 1/3 cup SPLENDA® No Calorie Sweetener, Granulated
  • 1 teaspoon molasses
  • 1/4 cup light butter
  • 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground mace
  • 2 pounds butternut squash – peeled, seeded, and cut into 1/2 inch slices
  • 2 large apples – cored, and cut into 1/2 inch slices

Preparation

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).
  2. In a medium bowl, stir together SPLENDA® Granulated Sweetener, molasses, butter, flour, salt, and mace. Arrange squash in an ungreased 9×13 inch baking dish. Top with slices of apple, then sprinkle with the sugar mixture. Cover with a lid or aluminum foil.
  3. Bake for 50 to 60 minutes in the preheated oven, or until squash is tender.

Nutritional Information (per serving)

  • Calories: 120
  • Calories from Fat: 30
  • Total Fat: 3.5g
  • Saturated Fat: 2g
  • Cholesterol: 10mg
  • Sodium: 340mg
  • Total Carbs: 24g
  • Dietary Fiber: 4g
  • Sugars: 9g
  • Protein: 2g

Green Beans Romano

A great dish with sun-dried tomatoes and almonds.

Serves: 4
Serving Size: 1/4 of recipe

Ingredients:

  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1/3 cup slivered almonds
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 16-ounce package of frozen green beans, thawed
  • 1/3 cup sun-dried tomatoes, slivered
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt

Preparation:
In a medium skillet, heat olive oil over medium-high heat. Saute almonds and garlic until golden. (Watch carefully so they don’t burn!) Add green beans, sun-dried tomatoes, and salt; sauté 6 to 7 minutes, or until green beans are heated. Serve immediately.

Nutrition Information:

  • Calories 180
  • Total Fat 13 g
  • Saturated Fat 1.4 g
  • Trans Fat 0 g
  • Cholesterol 0 mg
  • Sodium 245 mg
  • Potassium 455 mg
  • Total Carbohydrate 14 g
  • Dietary Fiber 5 g
  • Sugars 2 g
  • Protein 5 g
  • Phosphorous 110 mg
  • Food Exchanges: 2 Vegetable, 2 1/2 Fat

A special note from diabetes.org
Not all recipes presented here are necessarily appropriate for all people with diabetes, nor will all recipes fit into every meal plan. No two meal plans are alike. Work with your health care provider, diabetes educator or dietitian to design a meal plan that’s right for you, and includes the foods you love. A key message for people with diabetes is “Carbs Count.” Foods high in carbs (carbohydrates) — bread, tortillas, rice, crackers, cereal, fruit, juice, milk, yogurt, potatoes, corn, peas, sweets — raise your blood glucose levels the most.

For many people, having 3 or 4 servings of a carb choice at each meal and 1 or 2 servings at snacks is about right. Keep an eye on your total number of servings. For example, if you choose to have dessert, cut back on potatoes.

Round out your meals with a serving of:

  • Meat (such as fish or chicken) or meat substitute (such as beans, eggs, cheese, and tofu) about the size of a deck of cards.
  • Non-starchy vegetables (such as broccoli or lettuce). If you have three (3) or more servings of non-starchy vegetables, count them as a carbohydrate choice. Three (3) servings is equal to 1 1/2 cups of cooked vegetables, or three (3) cups of raw vegetables.

Check your blood glucose to see how your food choices or these recipes affect your blood glucose. If your meal plan isn’t working for you, talk to your dietitian about making a new one.
Along with exercise and medications (insulin or oral diabetes pills), nutrition is important for good diabetes management. By eating well-balanced meals in the correct amounts, you can keep your blood glucose level as close to normal (non-diabetes level) as possible.

The recipes on this page are only a part of what is offered in recipe books from the American Diabetes Association. Many also include information on meal planning, portion control, food buying and seasoning, as well as general cooking hints and tips for people with diabetes.




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